Satiric Dancer, Paris
André Kertész
Satiric Dancer, Paris
André Kertész (1894-1985): Satiric Dancer, Paris; 1926. Gelatin silver print, image: 6-5/8 x 4-5/8 inches (16.8 x 11.8 cm); paper: 6-7/8 x 5 inches (17.5 x 12.8 cm). Private Collection.



'There was a Hungarian dancer. She was called Magda. This photo was taken in the studio of Etienne Beöthy, a friend of mine who was a sculptor. ...I said to her, 'Do something with "the spirit of the studio corner",' and she started to move on the sofa. She just made a movement. I took only two photographs. No need to shoot a hundred rolls like people do today. People in motion are wonderful to photograph. It means catching the right moment -- the moment when something changes into something else. It shows a kind of distortion similar to that in the photograph of the swimmer.’ (From Kertész on Kertész)

Christie’s: http://bitly.com/12A7yqV



André Kertész ... one of the most important photographers of the twentieth century. Working intuitively, he captured the poetry of modern urban life ... Neither a surrealist, nor a strict photojournalist, he nevertheless infused his best images with strong tenets of both. "You don't see" the things you photograph, he explained, "you feel them."

Read more: http://www.icp.org/museum/exhibitions/andre-kertesz