The Visionary Flowers
Yayoi Kusama
The Visionary Flowers
Yayoi Kusama (Japanese; Contemporary, Conceptual Art; b. 1929): The Visionary Flowers, 2002. Open air Sculpture, painted fiberglass-reinforced concrete; 720-1/2 x 639-3/4 x 416-1/8 inches (1830 x 1625 x 1057 cm). Matsumoto City Museum of Art, Nagano, Japan. © Yayoi Kusama. © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.



"The first known photograph of Kusama as a small child is an arresting image: her beautiful face with its grave expression appears above a cluster of gigantic dahlias, each bloom larger than her small head. In a watercolor of 1950 entitled Self Portrait, the sunflower is an anthropomorphic stand-in for the artist herself. Flowers have continued to populate Kusama's imaginary since the beginning of her career, and it is evident that the gay yet monstrous flower sculptures of today have their origins in the surrealistic specimens that pervade the landscapes of her early paintings.



With her unrivalled eye for color, pattern and sinuous baroque form, Yayoi Kusama developed Flowers That Bloom at Midnight-an exuberant series of fifteen unique sculptures cast in fiberglas-reinforced plastic and painted by hand-following major permanent sculptural commissions for public institutions that include The Visionary Flowers (2002), Matsumoto City Museum of Art, Nagano, Japan; Tulipes de Shangri-La (2003), Eurolille, Lille, France; and The Hymn of Life: Tulips (2007), Beverly Hills City Council, Los Angeles." (© artdaily.org)