Orange Outline
Franz Kline
Orange Outline
Franz Kline (American; Modernism, Abstract Expressionism; 1910-1962): Orange Outline, 1955. Oil on paperboard mounted on canvas, 38 x 40 inches (96.5 x 101.6 cm). North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. © The Franz Kline Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.



'Kline arrived at Abstract Expressionism later than others, having continued working in a figural style redolent of American Scene painters into the late 1940s. By that time, he was ready to concentrate on formal concerns, and his friendship with Willem de Kooning helped pave the way ... By late 1950, he was exhibiting abstract work that immediately brought him success. Large-scale black and white compositions of energetic, dramatic gestures in which wide swaths of paint thrust across the canvas. For many, even these works of complete abstraction still evoke figural references (to various landscapes or urban scenes of industry, or to trees or other referents). Kline acknowledged this residue of imagery: "There are forms that are figurative to me, and if they develop into a figurative image … it's all right if they do. I don't have the feeling that something has to be completely non-associative as far as figure form is concerned."' (© 2000–2013 The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Read more: https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/64.146



"From the late 1930s through the '50s, his biomorphic abstractions (which allude to figures and landscapes) and his figurative series Woman (see 1984.613.6) placed him at the center of the Abstract Expressionist movement."

Read More: http://bitly.com/13FGmrv



"There seem to be references to Japanese calligraphy in Kline's black and white paintings, although he always denied that connection.[2] Bridges, tunnels, buildings, engines, railroads, and other architectural and industrial icons are often suggested as imagery informing Kline's work."

Read more: http://bitly.com/1bHHIaS