The Earth is a Man
Roberto Matta
The Earth is a Man
Roberto Matta (Chilean, Surrealism, 1911-2002): The Earth Is a Man, 1942. Oil on canvas, 72 x 96 inches (182.9 x 243.8 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois, USA. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.



'In 1940, in a one-person show at the Julien Levy Gallery, “the most important commercial showcase for Surrealist art in New York," as H. H. Arnason wrote, Roberto Matta’s unprecedently large canvases -- they were thought to be “oversized" at the time -- “had a momentous impact on American experimental artists,"(2) that is, the Abstract Expressionists, perhaps most noteworthily Jackson Pollock, who began to use similarly sized canvases four years later. Matta, along with Arshile Gorky, was the last painter “claimed for Surrealism by André Breton," and continues to be thought of as a Surrealist, a sort of Abstract Surrealist. But whatever the “psychic automatism" involved in his paintings -- however profound and intense the feelings they express, however complex the unconscious fantasies invested in them, however bizarrely dream-like they may seem -- what seems more important today, from the viewpoint of painting, is their enormous size and grandeur.' (Donald Kuspit, www.artnet.com)



Read more (Donald Kuspit, "Roberto Matta, The Greatness of Matta"): http://bitly.com/1p3F7yX