Nebamun Fowling in the Marshes, fragment of a scene from the tomb-chapel of Nebamun, Western Thebes, Egypt
Ancient, Egyptian
Nebamun Fowling in the Marshes
Nebamun Fowling in the Marshes, fragment of a scene from the tomb-chapel of Nebamun, Western Thebes, Egypt; Late 18th Dynasty, c. 1350 BCE. Tempera on plaster; h 83 x w 98 x d 22 cm. British Museum, London, UK.



"Nebamun is shown hunting birds, in a small boat with his wife Hatshepsut and their young daughter, in the marshes of the Nile ... traditional parts of tomb-chapel decoration for hundreds of years and show the dead tomb-owner ‘enjoying himself and seeing beauty’, as the hieroglyphic caption here says.

This is more than a simple image of recreation. Fertile marshes were seen as a place of rebirth and eroticism. Hunting animals could represent Nebamun’s triumph over the forces of nature as he was reborn ...

A tawny cat catches birds among the papyrus stems. Cats were family pets, but he is shown here because a cat could also represent the Sun-god hunting the enemies of light and order. His unusual gilded eye hints at the religious meanings of this scene. (britishmuseum.org)

Read more: http://bitly.com/19KBpXp



Of Interest: "Nebamun Fowling in the Marshes: A Masterpiece of Ancient Egyptian Design": http://www.all-about-egypt.com/nebamun-paintings.html